Travel

A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

The Biltmore Estate, America’s largest home, is one of my favorite places in the country.  Because George Vanderbilt’s massive chateau is only a 2-hour drive from my home in North Carolina, I’ve had the opportunity to visit the awe-inspiring property many times. For my birthday this year, my wonderful husband gave me a weekend trip to Biltmore. Although there’s always something new to see, (currently costumes from the movie Titanic are displayed throughout the house), we chose not to tour the mansion this time around. Instead, we spent our time enjoying the beautiful weather and taking in the thousands of Spring blooms that grace the 50 acres of the estate’s sprawling formal and natural gardens, designed by famed landscape architect, Fredrick Law Olmsted.

Biltmore Estate Mansion in Asheville, NC --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
The estate shuttles parked in front of The Biltmore Mansion run every 15 minutes to points of interest around the property.

As a special birthday treat, we reserved a lovely room with a view of the Blue Ridge Mountains at the luxurious Inn On Biltmore Estate.

The Inn On Biltmore Estate (Source)

Because we were staying on property, we had access to everything the estate has to offer, except for the house, without having to purchase a ticket. We also were able to utilize the free shuttles that run continuously from the two on-site hotels to the house, gardens, stables, winery, and the Antler Hill Village which is a dining, shopping and exhibition area.

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We arrived around noon and after a delicious alfresco lunch served on the Inn’s veranda overlooking the Estate’s vineyards, we took the shuttle to the front of the mansion to begin our day in the gardens. There are 2.5 miles of paths through Biltmore’s manicured garden spaces.

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There was not much to see on the terraces or the Italian Garden in early Spring. The Italian Garden features classical statues and three water gardens. Koi fish were swimming in the pools, but otherwise, the garden was barren of the water lilies, lotus, and papyrus that will emerge from the watery beds in summer.

View From the South Terrace of The Biltmore Mansion in Asheville, NC --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
View From the South Terrace

View of the Blue Ridge Mountains from the terrace of the Biltmore Mansion in Asheville, NC --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

View of the Library Terrace of the Biltmore Mansion in Asheville, NC --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
The Wisteria is still dormant on the arbor over the Library Terrace.
Statue of a cherub in the Italian Garden of the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, NC --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
Statue of a cherub in the Italian Garden

After exiting the Italian Garden, we followed the path through the Shrub Garden which is planted with over 500 varieties of shrubs, trees, and plants.

Shrub Garden at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, NC --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
Shrub Garden with Japanese maples, dogwoods, and redbuds
Pink and white double daffodils in the Shrub Garden --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
Pink and white double daffodils put on a show throughout the Shrub Garden.

Pink and white double daffodils -A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

Mahonia or Grape Holly growing in the Shrub Garden --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
Mahonia or Grape Holly is an excellent evergreen shrub with yellow blooms in Spring and ornamental blue berries in fall.
Pieris Japonica --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
The delicate white blossoms of this Pieris Japonica remind me of lily of the valley.

After the Shrub Garden, we strolled along the trail into the Spring garden. The Spring Garden sits in a little valley. It has a pathway that circles around a central grassy area surrounded by Spring blooming shrubs such as flowering quince, spirea, redbuds, dogwood, fothergilla, and evergreens.

Spring Garden --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

Grassy lawn in the center of the Spring Garden --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
The grassy lawn in the center of the Spring Garden offers a great place to rest and take in the beauty of the landscape.
Tulip Magnolia in the Spring Garden --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
This Tulip Magnolia is one of the early bloomers in the Spring Garden.

When we made our way out of the Spring garden, we entered the Azalea Garden which contains one of the largest collections of native azaleas in the country. Unfortunately, we were a couple of weeks too early for most of the azaleas.

Azalea --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
One of a few hardy early azaleas blooming in the expansive Azalea Garden.

Another garden that was not quite ready for prime time was the Rose Garden. We have visited the formal Rose Garden in the summer when the 200 varieties of hybrid and heirloom roses are in their full glory, and I can tell you that it is definitely worth another visit just to experience their beauty and fragrance.

The formal Rose Garden not yet in bloom in Spring --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
The formal Rose Garden was not yet in bloom.
This is what the Rose Garden looks like in full bloom during the Summer, so it is clear to see that it’s worth visiting Biltmore in every season. (Source)

From the rose garden, we entered the Conservatory and were utterly dazzled by the colorful array of orchids and tropical plants that are cultivated inside this impressive brick greenhouse.

Conservatory --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

Gorgeous display of orchids
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Medinilla magnifica

 

I was curious about the large pendulous pink blooms on the impressive plant that topped the dramatic display of orchids, bromeliads, begonias, and hydrangeas at the entrance to the Conservatory. I looked it up, and it is a Medinilla Magnifica and it is truly magnificent.

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As gorgeous as the tropical plants were, the real showstopper of Spring “Biltmore Blooms,” as they call it, is the spectacular display of tulips in the Walled Garden. The color combinations of the different varieties of tulips were gorgeous and gave me some great ideas and inspiration for my own garden.

Spectacular display of thousands of tulips in the Walled Garden --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

Spring in the Walled Garden --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

Tulip display in the Walled Garden --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

Spring in the Walled Garden --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

Tulips and trellises in the Walled Garden --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

Spring bulbs in front of the Conservatory --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

Full to the brim with the beauty of the Biltmore’s Estate gardens, we headed back to clean up for a special fireside dinner in the Inn’s elegant dining room.

Because I can never get enough of flowers and plants, the following day, before heading home, we spent a few hours wandering through some of the 65-acres of cultivated gardens in the North Carolina Arboretum. A few of the stunning garden exhibits we viewed included the Quilt Garden, the Heritage Garden, and the Plants Of Promise Garden. In addition to all the natural beauty, the Arboretum offers visitors the opportunity to connect with nature through their fascinating collection of art and sculpture on exhibit throughout the gardens and the education center.

Hedge Against Extinction sculpture at the NC Arboretum --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
“Hedge Against Extinction” by Martin Webster is one of the many sculptures that are a part of the Arboretum’s permanent art collection.
The Bee Spiral sculpture at the NC Arboretum --A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens
“The Bee Spiral” by Mac Franklin is made of reclaimed garden edging and is so named because the spiraling metal tiers are planted with flowers that attract pollinating bees to the garden.

This was my second visit to the NC Arboretum and my fifth visit to the Biltmore Estate Gardens. Needless to say, this will not be my last visit to either place. In fact, I may be heading back to Biltmore sooner rather than later, as an exhibit of renowned glass sculptor, Dale Chihuly’s work will be installed and displayed throughout Biltmore’s gardens from May 17th – October 7th. I am particularly interested in the “Chihuly Nights At Biltmore,” where guests will be able to view the large-scale glass sculpture lit up in the midst of the estate’s majestic landscape.

Inspiration for your garden from the gorgeous color combinations in Biltmore's Spring Gardens #BiltmoreEstate, #GardenColor, #SpringGardens, #NCArboretum,

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22 thoughts on “A Spring Tour Of The Biltmore Estate Gardens

  1. What a fabulous weekend Lisa. I have always wanted to go to the Biltmore and Spring is one of my favorite seasons. Maybe next year. I have been many times to the NC Arboretum. There is a farmers market close by to the Arboretum. I like to stop and get cheese, bread, and fruit and have a picnic on the grounds. Maybe old man winter has finally held back the cold! Thank you for sharing your weekend.
    Dh

    1. Thanks, Deborah. As I mentioned in my post, the Biltmore is one of my favorite places and I am always interested in going back there. I really want to go back during the Chihuly exhibition. Maybe we could go together?

    1. Thanks so much for commenting, Donna. It was a lovely birthday trip. The tulips were amazing. I so wish I could grow them in my yard but the minute they emerge from the ground, it’s like the dinner bell rings and all the woodland creatures come running!

  2. Already making plans to visit to see the Chihuly exhibit- went to Seattle two years ago and the glass there was spectacular indoors and out! Planning on the night exhibit to help celebrate out 25th wedding anniversary- your photos are beautiful!

    1. Thanks so much for your kind comment. I saw the Chihuly exhibit several years ago at Phipps Conservatory in Pittsburgh and enjoyed it very much. I think that the Biltmore gardens will be a particularly spectacular setting for his glass sculptures. I hope you enjoy it and have a wonderful 25th-anniversary celebration!

  3. Stunning. Will have to visit again one of these days. We did a fall visit a few years ago and instead of tulips the Biltmore had thousand of gold and rust colored mums. Thanks for sharing this trip.

    1. Thank you so much for commenting. That’s the great thing about Biltmore’s gardens. There is always something to see in every season.

  4. Spring has not exactly “sprung” where I am, so I was heartened to see all the magnificent blooms. Thanks for reminding me that there may actually be some truth to the promise of spring!

    1. Thanks so much for commenting. Hang in there. We’re sending warm wishes from the South, so Spring is bound to be on its way!

  5. So much beauty and color in one spot. I like the fact that there are surprises along the way too, like the sculpture. It must feel very calming to be able to walk around those gardens.

    1. Thanks, Mary. The gardens are truly beautiful and they definitely provide me with inspiration and a sense of peace.

  6. What a beautiful tour, the tulips were stunning! We have stayed at the Inn and loved our stay. Biltmore is definitely a treasure. We toured Chihuly’s magnificent garden and museum in Seattle. I am thinking I should come see his gorgeous work presented at the Biltmore!

    1. Thanks, Pam. I definitely think that the Biltmore Gardens will be a perfect showcase for Chihuly’s stunning work. I am already scheming to get back there for a Chihuly wine-sipping evening in the gardens!

    1. Thank you so much for commenting. The Biltmore is truly a special place to visit. There is so much more to enjoy there than just the gardens. The house is spectacular and they have all kinds of additional attractions such as horseback riding, wine tasting, fly fishing, clay shooting, and so much more.

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